Practices

Terminations

Posted by on Aug 31, 2013 in Practices | 0 comments

Terminations are among the most difficult things a manager has to do, but this may become necessary for a variety of reasons: performance issues, changes in job requirements, company downsizing, etc.  It is never easy, but things will go more smoothly if the manager is prepared. It is important to know the employee’s entitlements under Employment Standards as well as the company’s potential liability at Common Law.  Using this information, prepare (or have legal counsel prepare) a letter to the employee that clearly states the situation, and that outlines any notice period, or the terms of payment in lieu of notice.  Notice is not required when the employer has just cause to dismiss, but just cause is often difficult to prove, and legal advice is definitely recommended. If there are other employees, or if the person deals with customers or suppliers, it is important to decide how these people will be informed.  They don’t require details: just a short message advising that X is leaving the company effective on this date, and until further notice, contact Y for any business issues.  Other employees will have various reactions to the news, and it is important to have a plan for dealing with their concerns.  The termination meeting is recognized as being stressful for the employee, but many people do not realize, until faced with it, how stressful it can be for the manager.  If at all possible, it is best to have a second person present – usually the H.R. Manager if there is one.  Then, the manager need only give the employee the bad news, and leave the room, allowing the second person, who is less personally involved, to deal with the employee’s questions, emotions, and concerns.  In the absence of an H.R. Manager, there are outplacement companies or consultants who provide a range of services, from consulting with the manager and attending the termination meeting, to providing career transitioning assistance for the...

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Recruiting and Hiring

Posted by on Aug 31, 2013 in Practices | 0 comments

Recruiting candidates who are the right fit for your organization can be challenging.  A person may have the education and training, but not the right personality.  Some people are good at presenting themselves in interviews, but may not be as well qualified as less polished individuals.  Others would be excellent employees, but don’t know how to sell themselves.  Interviewers may have personal biases that prevent them from recognizing the attributes of good candidates. Define the Job Defining the job means more than just picking a title and advertising for an open position.  What are the most important tasks and projects you require of this job? What education, experience, and attributes are important?   What skills can be easily taught if the candidate does not have them?  What are bona fide occupational requirements, and what accommodation can be made for a person with a disability? What is the work environment like (e.g. do you need someone who thrives in a noisy, open atmosphere, or someone who works well in a quiet, enclosed area?)  If you are replacing someone, what aspects of that person’s work would you like to see in your new employee, and what would you like to improve upon?  Incorporate all of this information into a job description, and you will know what you are looking for. Where To Look Identify your potential talent pool: where are you most likely to find the candidates you want? How will you reach them?  You might consider the following:          university or college job boards          advertisements in trade publications         Human Resource Development Canada’s job posting site         Facebook, Linkedin, and similar sites         on-line job boards such as Workopolis or Monster         referrals from current employees (consider offering a referral bonus)         many newspapers offer an on-line placement in addition to a print ad         employment agencies Whichever means you select, how will you handle applications?  The internet, for example, is a great way to reach many people, but you can also be swamped with responses, often from people who are not qualified for the job.   How will you screen resumes and select the candidates you want to interview?  Job boards include software that helps you to screen using key words, and on-line recruiting sofware is available through companies like Taleo-Recruitsoft. Recruitment Agencies  Alternatively, you may work with a good recruitment agency, and let them do the leg-work for you, but only after you have done your homework.  The more information you can provide the agency, the better they will be at presenting candidates that meet your expectations.  There are many agencies out there: from the big multinationals to the individuals working from home.  Do your homework and make sure you find someone you trust, and with whom you are comfortable working.  You may deal with different agencies depending on their expertise (Finance, Sales, etc.).  Some people like to involve more than one agency, hoping to reach more candidates.  My preference is to work with one person I trust.  That person becomes an extension of my business: (s)he knows the jobs, the environment, and the kind of candidate who would be a good fit, and (s)he makes my search a priority.   As well, the more agencies I use, the more I have to be involved in keeping track of the agencies and candidates.  When selecting an agency, make sure you know whether they work on consignment or contingency.   If on consignment, you pay a fee to hire the agency to do a search.  Those who work on contingency don’t get paid unless you hire one of their candidates.  There are advantages to both, but...

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Payroll

Posted by on Aug 31, 2013 in Practices | 0 comments

Canadian employers are required to establish a Payroll Account with The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).   A payroll account can be added to an existing business number (BN).  Employers are responsible for ensuring that the people they hire are eligible to work in Canada.  This is accomplished by obtaining the employee’s Social Insurance Number (SIN) and keeping it on file.  The employee must show you his/her SIN card or letter. If the SIN number begins with a “9” you are also required to confirm that the employee is authorized to work in Canada and has a valid immigration document. Employers are required to remit legislated payroll deductions and employer contributions to CRA by the due date, or there may be a penalty.  Unless other arrangements exist, remittances are to be made by the 15th of the month following that in which they were taken.  Legislated remittances include: Income Tax Tax on taxable benefits and other taxable amounts Canada Pension Employment Insurance Employers must provide each employee with a Statement of Earnings for each pay period. Employers must report employees’ annual income on a T4 or T4A slip, and file an information return on or before the last day of February of the following year. Paper and electronic payroll records must be kept for a minimum of six years. Payroll processing can be outsourced: for example, both ADP Canada and Ceridian Canada provide services for small business: ADP Canada defines a small business as one with 1 – 49 employees. USEFUL LINKS: (provided for information only: I do not endorse any organization) Canada Revenue Agency Payroll Information: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/bsnss/tpcs/pyrll/menu-eng.html Federal Government Payroll Deductions On-Line Calculator:  http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/pdoc/ Canada Revenue Agency Payroll Guide:  http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pub/tg/t4001/t4001-11e.pdf ADP Canada: http://adp.ca/ Ceridian Canada:...

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Orientation and Onboarding (The New Employee)

Posted by on Aug 31, 2013 in Practices | 0 comments

Orientation and Onboarding refer to the process of getting the employee in position and up to speed.  The first few weeks on a new job are crucial: as managers evaluate the employee’s fit for the organization, and as the employee assesses the company’s fit with his/her expectations.  The more that is done to make the person feel comfortable during this period, the more likely that there will be a happy, committed hire. Prior to the new person joining the organization, let the team know that person’s name and start date.  On the first day, take the new employee around, explain the layout, and introduce the rest of the team.  Assign someone to show the new person the ropes, and make sure (s)he is included in group activities such as lunch and breaks. Plan the first week’s work: make sure the new person knows what to expect.  Assign a mentor who can answer questions and resolve problems for the first few weeks. Be available and keep in touch with the mentor and the new...

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Managing Others

Posted by on Aug 31, 2013 in Practices | 0 comments

Managing others doesn’t come easily to everyone.  There is an adage that people don’t leave companies: they leave managers.  The opposite is just as true: a good manager can keep a team motivated and engaged through the most difficult times. Managing in the 21st century is about motivating, engaging, coaching and developing others in a fast-paced and increasingly diverse workplace.   The technical skills that get one to the top of a trade and the entrepreneurial skills that help one develop a business are not the skills required to manage others.  Today’s leaders are expected to be both managers and coaches.  Managers focus on the “what” and the “how” while coaches focus on the “who.”  Leadership is about getting the best out of others.  It is also about attracting, motivating, and retaining good people.  There are many organizations that provide coaching and training for managers, and, while I do not endorse any organization, I have provided below a few with which I am familiar:  The Canadian Management Centre (CMC), an affiliate of AMA International, provides leadership training through traditional classroom settings, web-based training, and e-learning.  They also provide free information on their website under the “Free Resources” tab.  Contact them at:  CMC: http://www.cmctraining.org/ The Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) is a global training organization, based in Greensboro N.C.  While their North American locations are solely based in the United States, they are affiliated with the Niagara Institute in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.  The Niagara Institute is licenced to offer CCL leadership programs.  Contact them at: CCL: http://www.ccl.org/leadership/index.aspx Niagara Institute: http://www.niagarainstitute.com/ Franklin Covey Canada offers both corporate and public training across Canada, including The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, and The Seven Habits for Managers.  Contact them at: Franklin Covey Canada: http://www.franklincovey.ca/FCCAWeb/aspx/ Owen Stewart Performance Resources, based in Port Perry, Ontario, provides training videos of all kinds, including the very popular Fish! series.  Many videos can be previewed on-line, and rentals generally include leaders’ guides.  Contact them at:...

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Human Resource Information System (HRIS)

Posted by on Aug 31, 2013 in Practices | 0 comments

HRIS stands for Human Resource Information System.  A good HRIS program will allow you to store all information about each employee, and to retrieve and manipulate the information to meet your needs.   A cost-effective, but time-consuming, way to do this is through a data base program that exports data to a spreadsheet.  To ensure compliance with privacy legislation, any such system should be maintained on a secure computer or server. Commercially-available HRIS programs have reporting functions built in.  Users of ADP or Ceridian payroll processing services might consider their HR programs.  As a business grows, some of the other available services may also be of interest (e.g. performance management, succession management). Providers of integrated ERP (enterprise resource planning) systems, like SAP, and Oracle, also include an HRIS component that integrates with other platforms to support the business.  USEFUL LINKS: (for information purposes only: I do not endorse any of these organizations) Simple HR: http://simplehr.ca/  ADP Canada: http://adp.ca/ Ceridian Canada: http://ceridian.ca/ Success Factors: http://www.successfactors.com/ SAP Canada: http://www.sap.com/canada/index.epx Oracle Canada:...

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