Resources

An on-line resource for small businesses in Ontario

Birkman

Posted by on Sep 14, 2013 in Understanding Others | 0 comments

  One of the primary assets of a Human Resources Manager is to be objective.  This means being non-judgmental, and able to understand another’s point of view.  I was fortunate enough to be introduced to the Birkman Method ®  early in my career, and I believe it contributed to my growth in Emotional Intelligence.1   The Birkman Method is a powerful tool that identifies a person’s passions, behaviors, motivation and interests.  I have used Birkman for Teambuilding, Conflict Management, and most recently in Career Counselling, but there are many more ways it can be used:  Selection and Hiring Retention Coaching Executive Coaching Leadership Development Talent Management Career Development Career Transition Conflict Resolution Teambuilding If you would like to know how Birkman can help you and your organization, contact me at: purie@urhr.ca or 226-750-3596 Useful Links Birkman International, Inc.: www.birkman.com   1 Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to identify, assess, and control emotions....

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Generational Differences

Posted by on Sep 14, 2013 in Understanding Others | 0 comments

Much has been said about the challenges of managing different generations at work: the result of people working longer and the changes that occurred in the twentieth century.     Diffences in background and experience can lead to conflict and misunderstanding, and can be a challenge for the manager.  Research by Birkman International, Inc. suggests that our differences are not in personality, but in cultural attitudes and values.  Their research “indicates that values and behaviors are similar among generations, but priorities are different.”  (Source: How Do Generational Differences Impact Organizations and Teams? Whitepaper* by Birkman International) THE GENERATIONS: Veterans (those born prior to 1943) were stongly influenced by the great depression, the second world war, and the korean war.  They value respect for authority, honour, dedication, hard work and discipline.  Baby boomers may see thm as dictatorial and rigid; Generation X may see them as being too set in their ways, and Millenials may see then as trustworthy, and good leaders. Baby Boomers (born 1943 to 1960) were influenced by the Vietnam war, the fight for civil rights, the peace corps, and flower power.  They value optimism, team orientation, personal growth, and work.  Veterans may see them as self-absorbed; Generation X may see them as self-righteous, workaholics, and too political; Millenials may think they are “cool” but they work too much. Generation X (born between 1960 and 1980) grew up in the shadow of the Baby Boomers, and were the first “latch-key” children.  They value diversity, technoliteracy, fun, and self-reliance, and they work to live, not live to work.  Veterans may see them as disrespectful and slackers; Baby Boomers may see them as rude, slackers, and spending too much time on the internet; Millenials may see them as depressed. Millenials (born between 1980 and 2000) grew up with home computers, helicopter parents, and organized play.  They value optimism, civic duty, sociability, and street smarts.  Veterans may see them as well-mannered but soft; Boomers may see them as undisciplined and needing too much attention; Generation X may see them as self-absorbed. Source: Generations At Work Managing the Clash of Veterans, Boomers, Xers and Nexters in Your Workplace by Ron Zemke, Claire Raines, and Bob Filipczak published by AMACOM American Management Association USEFUL LINKS: (for information only: with the exception of Birkman International, I do not endorse these organizations) * Birkman Interational, Inc. White Papers:  http://www.birkman.com/news/whitePapers.php To Order Generations At Work from Chapters/Indigo: http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/item/0814404804-item.html?s_campaign=Google_BookSearch_organic&cookieCheck=1 AARP Leading a Multigenerational Workforce:...

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Privacy

Posted by on Sep 14, 2013 in Legislation | 0 comments

Privacy in Canada is protected by the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) and is under the jurisdiction of the Federal Department of Justice.   Provinces that have essentially similar legislation are exempt from the federal legislation, as employers in those provinces are covered by their provincial legislation. At the time of this writing, Ontario does not have similar legislation. The Act applies to “every organization in respect of personal information that the organization collects, uses or discloses in the course of commercial activities” or “is about an employee of the organization and that the organization collects, uses or discloses in connection with the operation of a federal work, undertaking or business.”  At the time of this writing, PIPEDA only applies to personal information of employees of federal works, undertakings or businesses, and only Alberta, British Columbia, and Quebec have similar legislation.  The name, title, business address, and business telephone number of an employee are not protected under PIPEDA.  USEFUL LINKS: Department of Justice:  http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/  PIPEDA: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/P-8.6/ PHIPA:  PHIPA stands for Personal Health Information Protection Act and is an Ontario legislation dealing with the collection and disclosure of personal health information of individuals.  While the legislation is intended for health providers and record-keepers, it should be kept in mind when maintaining any employee health information. USEFUL LINKS: PHIPA:...

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Other Benefits

Posted by on Sep 6, 2013 in Benefits | 0 comments

Flexible Benefits were introduced in recognition of the fact that employees’ needs differ depending on their situation, and in response to requests for additional coverages such as day care, fitness club memberships etc. Certain core benefits may be required (e.g. life insurance, disability) and then there is a set dollar amount per employee to select other options. If employees do not use the full dollar amount to purchase benefits, some companies pay the balance to a cash account for the employee. Other Benefits The perceived value of benefits depends on employees’ needs. Some things valued by employees include paid tuition, paid education leave, extra time off, flexible hours, and...

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Life Insurance

Posted by on Sep 6, 2013 in Benefits | 0 comments

Employee Group Life Insurance Group Life Insurance provides insurance coverage at affordable group rates.   Coverage is typically a multiple of the employee’s base pay, or total direct compensation (salary plus bonus/commission). Dependents’ Life Insurance  Basic dependents’ life insurance is typically a set amount such as $10,000 for the spouse and $5,000 for each child. Optional Life Insurance Some insurance companies provide optional life insurance plans for the employee and/or spouse.  Premiums are at group rates, and depend on variables such as the insured’s age and...

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Health and Dental Insurance

Posted by on Sep 6, 2013 in Benefits | 0 comments

Health and dental insurance, while popular with employees, is becoming increasingly expensive, and employers are looking for ways to control costs.  Many employers ask employees to share in the cost of premiums (e.g. 50/50; 60/40; 80/20) and some plans pay after the employee has reached a set deductible amount. Goup Insurance covers many of the medical expenses not covered by the provincial health plan (OHIP).  The company pays a premium to an insurance company to cover the cost of benefits paid out, plus administrative services.   Examples of Group Health Insurance:          prescription drugs          ambulance services          private or semiprivate hospital coverage (OHIP pays for a ward)          out-of-province/country emergency medical services          paramedical services (physiotherapy, massage, psychology, etc)           eye glasses Examples of Group Dental Insurance:          basic dental (checkups and fillings) – 80% to 100% of costs          major restorative (crowns) – 50% of costs          orthodontics – often for children only, and with a lifetime maximum   Another health and dental insurance option popular with some employers is an “Administrative Services Only (ASO)” contract with an insurance company.  The employer pays the insurance company to administer and adjudicate claims, but the claims are paid by the company.  This may be more cost-effective than the full group insurance plans, but companies bear the full risk of large...

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